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Hyperuricaemia in Young New Zealand Maori Men

  • T. Gibson
  • R. Waterworth
  • P. Hatfield
  • G. Robinson
  • K. Bremner
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 165)

Abstract

Many Polynesian peoples exhibit a susceptibility to hyperuricaemia and gout.1,2 This predisposition is a feature of widely distributed populations and suggests a common genetic role.3 The mechanism has not been clearly established. Maori men are reported to have a prevalence of gout in excess of 10%. They are also prone to obesity, diabetes, and hypertension.3 It is not known whether renal dysfunction is an additional feature of this disease spectrum. The present study examined the current prevalence of hyperuricaemia and gout in a male Maori population of working age. An attempt was made to reassess the relationship of obesity and hypertension with hyperuricaemia; and to determine the prevalence of renal impairment. The renal excretion of uric acid was also estimated.

Keywords

Uric Acid Serum Uric Acid Ponderal Index Regular Alcohol Urine Uric Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Gibson
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Waterworth
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Hatfield
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Robinson
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Bremner
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Guy’s HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Wellington Public HospitalNew Zealand

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