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Nodule-Specific Induction of Host Genes in Yellow Lupin

  • A. B. Legocki
  • A. Konieczny
  • C. Madrzak
  • P. Stróżycki
  • A. Wolánski
  • R. Kierzek
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 63)

Abstract

There is a substantial progress in our knowledge about genetic contribution of host plant to the process of symbiotic association between legume plants and Rhizobium species. This progress has been initiated recently by an elegant series of papers published by D.P.S. Verma concerning identification and synthesis in vitro of about 20 nodule-specific soybean polypeptides (nodulins).1,2 These studies revealed that soybean nodulins account for 7–11% of the total nodule proteins and that they represent a class of 12–20kd polypeptides. The most abundant nodule-specific protein is leghaemoglobin. The organization of leghaemoglobin genes in soybean has been proposed recently.3,4,5

Keywords

Rhizobium Species Yellow Lupin Nodule Protein Lupin Protein mRNA Hybridization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    R.P. Legocki and D.P.S. Verma, A nodule-specific plant protein (Nodulin-35) from soybean. Science, 205:190 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    R.P. Legocki and D.P.S. Verma, Identification of “nodule-specific” host proteins (nodulins) involved in the development of Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, Cell 20:153 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    E. Truelsen, K. Gausing, B. Jochimsen, P. Jørgensen and K.A. Marcker Cloning of soybean leghaemoglobin structural gene sequences synthesized in vitro, Nucl. Acids Res. 6: 3061 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    O. Wiborg, J.J. Hyldig-Nielsen, E.Ø. Jensen, K. Paludan and K.A. Marcker The nucleotide sequences of two leghaemoglobin genes from soybean, Nucl. Acids Res. 10: 3487 (1982).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    A. Konieczny and A.B. Legocki Isolation and in vitro translation of leghaemoglobin mRNA from yellow lupin root nodules, Acta Biochim. Polon. 25: 379 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    A. Konieczny and A.B. Legocki Translation and characterization of poly(A)-lacking RNA from lupin root nodules, Acta Biochim. Polon. 28: 83 (1981).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    S. Auger, D. Baulcombe and D.P.S. Verma Sequence complexities of the poly(A)-containing mRNA in uninfected soybean root and the nodule tissue developed due to the infection by Rhizobium, Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 563: 496 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. Legocki
    • 1
  • A. Konieczny
    • 1
  • C. Madrzak
    • 1
  • P. Stróżycki
    • 1
  • A. Wolánski
    • 1
  • R. Kierzek
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniveristy of AgricultureWolyńska 35Poland
  2. 2.Polish Academy of SciencesInstitute of Bioorganic ChemistryNoxkowskiego 12Poland

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