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Analysis of Cellular Components in Bacterial Classification and Diagnosis

  • Erik Jantzen

Abstract

Bacterial cell walls have always represented a challenge to the chemist. Substances not found elsewhere in nature are frequently detected and the chemical problems of isolation, purification, and structure elucidation of bacterial compounds are both fascinating and demanding. As a result, several fundamental achievements in organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and chromatography have been carried out by chemists working on bacterial compounds, and a multitude of bacterial substances have been described over the last decades.

Keywords

Fatty Acid Composition Fatty Acid Profile Cellular Fatty Acid Acta Path Fatty Acid Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erik Jantzen
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Public HealthOslo 1Norway

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