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Parents

The Mental Health Professionals’ Scapegoat
  • Richard R. J. Lewine

Abstract

The deinstitutionalization of psychiatric patients during the past two decades has clearly had a major impact on those who care for the chronically mentally ill (APA, 1979; Bassuk & Gerson, 1978; Klerman, 1977). Especially striking is the role that the families of many of these patients have had to assume. With an estimated 54% of discharged psychiatric patients returning home, these families have had to undertake the often burdensome task of primary caretaker (APA, 1979; Carpenter, 1978; Hatfield, 1978; Hilton, 1979). For many patients and ex-patients the family is the only social network available (Mosher & Keith, 1980).

Keywords

Mental Illness Anorexia Nervosa Mental Health Professional Psychiatric Patient Chronic Mental Illness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard R. J. Lewine
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois State Psychiatric InstituteChicagoUSA

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