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Stimulation of Host Resistance to Metastatic Tumors by Macrophage Activating Agents Encapsulated in Liposomes

  • Richard Kirsh
  • George Poste
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 162)

Abstract

The disappointing results obtained in experimental and clinical efforts to devise effective, specific, active immunotherapy procedures for the treatment of cancer have stimulated renewed interest in mechanisms of non-specific “natural” antitumor surveillance mediated by macrophages and natural killer cells. A significant effort is now underway in many laboratories to develop effective biological response modifier (BRM) agents that can stimulate the antitumor activities of these cells. Liposomes offer a useful carrier system for delivering BRM agents to macrophages in vivo. When injected i.v. the majority of liposomes are taken up by phagocytic reticuloendothelial cells in the liver and spleen, and by circulating monocytes (reviewed in 6). The passive localization of liposomes into mononuclear phagocytes is frustrating to investigators who wish to target liposomes to other cell types in the body, including tumor cells, but provides a highly effective mechanism for “targeting”, albeit passively, of liposome-encapsul-ated materials to macrophages. We have exploited this pathway to deliver natural and synthetic molecules with macrophage activating activity to macrophages in situ.

Keywords

Tumor Immunity Biological Response Modifier Muramyl Dipeptide Active Immunotherapy Median Life Span 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Kirsh
    • 1
  • George Poste
    • 1
  1. 1.Smith Kline and French LaboratoriesDepartment of Tumor BiologyPhiladelphiaUSA

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