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CMV and Renal Allograft Survival

  • R. H. Kerman
  • R. Conklin
  • D. Cahall
  • C. T. Van Buren
  • B. D. Kahan
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 162)

Abstract

A majority of renal transplant recipients become actively infected witb cytomegalovirus (CMV) (1). Most patients displaying CMV antibody preoperatively experience infections due to reactivation of latent virus. Primary CMV infections occur in preoperatively seronegative recipients due to organs from seropositive donors or to blood transfusions (2). CMV infection has serious consequences, including acute allograft rejection and patient death (1). Although CMV infection in renal allograft recipients has been thought to be associated with rejection and graft loss, there is little information concerning the relationship between tissue typing for HLA A, B and DR antigens, CMV infection, and renal allograft survival (3). In the present study the effect of CMV infection on the success of renal transplantation was assessed by serologic analysis of recipients before and following transplantation. Recipients were grouped based on the degree of incompatibility for HLA A, B and DR antigens with their donors.

Keywords

Graft Survival Renal Transplant Recipient Graft Loss Cytomegalovirus Infection Renal Allograft Recipient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. H. Kerman
    • 1
  • R. Conklin
    • 1
  • D. Cahall
    • 1
  • C. T. Van Buren
    • 1
  • B. D. Kahan
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Surgery and Laboratory MedicineUniversity of Texas Medical SchoolHoustonUSA

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