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Activation of Macrophages for Killing of Rickettsiae: Analysis of Macrophage Effector Function after Rickettsial Inoculation of Inbred Mouse Strains

  • Carol A. Nacy
  • Monte S. Meltzer
  • Edward J. Leonard
  • Mary M. Stevenson
  • Emil Skamene
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 162)

Abstract

The rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that infect a variety of cells in vitro, including peritoneal macrophages of mice (1). The organisms replicate freely in the cytoplasm of infected macrophages and, within 24–30 hr of onset of replication, migrate from infected macrophages to initiate infection of other cells (Fig. 1). Both numbers of infected macrophages and numbers of intracellular rickettsiae increase with time in culture. The rickettsiae, because of their obligate intracellular parasitism, have evolved unique ways to avoid most mechanisms of intracellular destruction. The very location of rickettsial replication, in the cytoplasmic matrix of the cell, protects these organisms from potent lytic enzymes of phagolysosomal systems (1,2). That this destruction does occur in vivo, however, is documented by development of both natural resistance and acquired immunity following rickettsial inoculation of mice (3,4,5).

Keywords

Macrophage Activation Infected Macrophage Scrub Typhus Tumoricidal Activity Susceptible Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol A. Nacy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Monte S. Meltzer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Edward J. Leonard
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mary M. Stevenson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Emil Skamene
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyWalter Reed Army Institute of ResearchUSA
  2. 2.National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Montreal General Hospital Research InstituteMontrealCanada

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