Improvement of Abnormal Lymphocyte Responses in “Atypical” Mycobacteriosis with Indomethacin

  • U. G. MasonIII
  • L. E. Greenberg
  • S. S. Yen
  • C. H. Kirkpatrick
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 162)

Abstract

Although chemotherapy of tuberculosis has resulted in a dramatic decrease in the number of new and active cases in the United States, relatively little improvement has been made in the treatment of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Depending on the type of hospital and population served by the hospital, the incidence of “atypical” mycobacteria may be as high as 30% of all mycobacterial infections (1). Aside from the clinical importance and economic consequences of these infections, these chronically ill patients provide a valuable source of new information concerning cellular defense mechanisms and resistance to chronic infectious diseases. Unlike patients with chronic fungal infections who commonly develop disease during early childhood, patients with “atypical” mycobacterial diseases are usually well during early childhood and adolescence (2). Thus, to explain the predisposition of individuals to infections with these organisms, one would predict an abnormality of immunoregulatory mechanisms rather than a failure to develop immunocompetent lymphoid cells.

Keywords

Depression Tuberculosis Prostaglandin Indomethacin Candida 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. G. MasonIII
    • 1
  • L. E. Greenberg
    • 1
  • S. S. Yen
    • 1
  • C. H. Kirkpatrick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineNational Jewish Hospital and Research CenterDenverUSA

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