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Cell-Mediated Immune Injury to the Heart

  • H. Friedman
  • S. Specter
  • A. Cerdan
  • C. Cerdan
  • K. Chang
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 161)

Abstract

Ischemic heart disease is considered a primary form of fatal cardiac disease both in the United States and many other developed countries of the world. A frequent consequence of sudden myocardial ischemia, such as that which follows coronary thrombosis, is myocardial infarction. Muscle necrosis may be prevented if collateral circulation is adequate. However, it is now widely accepted that during corrective surgical procedures cardiac antigens may be released and an autoimmuner-type response may ensue. The relationship between cardiac manifestations after cardiac infarction or cardiac surgery is unresolved and controversial. Cardiac autoantibodies are often detected in the sera of patients following infarction and/or cardiotomy but the pathogenic roles of these serum factors have not been unequivocally explained. Furthermore, little attention has been directed to the nature and role of autoreactive immunocompetent cells in the autoimmune-associated cardiac type disorders.

Keywords

Migration Inhibitory Factor Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Saline Extract Rheumatic Heart Disease Migration Inhibition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Friedman
    • 1
  • S. Specter
    • 1
  • A. Cerdan
    • 2
  • C. Cerdan
    • 2
  • K. Chang
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Med. Micro, and Immunol.Univ. of South Florida College of Med.TampaUSA
  2. 2.Deborah Heart and Lung HospitalBrowns MillsUSA

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