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Ion Movements in Adult Rat Heart Myocytes

  • Gerald P. Brierley
  • Charlene Hohl
  • Ruth A. Altschuld
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 161)

Abstract

Recent improvements in methodology for the isolation of adult heart cells (6, 9, 10, 18, 22, 25, 31, 36, 46) yield myocytes that are more suitable for the study of cellular and intracellular ion movements than those previously available. For example, 92% of the cells in the myocyte preparations currently in use in our laboratory are viable by trypan blue exclusion, 85% show the elongated, rod-like configuration of heart cells in situ (Fig. 1A), and the rod cells show morphology in the electron microscope that is indistinguishable from cells in intact heart tissue (Fig. 2). These cells also contain enzyme profiles corresponding to those of heart cells in situ (34) and ATP, total adenine nucleotide, and creatine phosphate at levels quite comparable to those found in intact heart tissue (19,24, and 34 nmol • mg protein-1, respectively; Ref. 22).

Keywords

Heart Cell Anaerobic Incubation Total Adenine Nucleotide Heart Myocytes Adenine Nucleotide Pool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald P. Brierley
    • 1
  • Charlene Hohl
    • 1
  • Ruth A. Altschuld
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiological Chemistry, College of MedicineOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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