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Stimulation of a B Cell Subset by Anti-Immunoglobulin and T Cell-Derived Regulatory Molecules

  • William E. Paul
  • Anthony L. DeFranco
  • Kenji Nakanishi
  • Elizabeth S. Raveche
  • John Farrar
  • Maureen Howard
Part of the Nobel Foundation Symposia Published by Plenum book series (NOFS, volume 55)

Abstract

B lymphocytes may be divided into distinct subpopulations which differ from one another in the membrane antigens they express, in the immunogens to which they respond, and in their sensitivity to distinct regulatory mechanisms. The appreciation that such subpopulations exist is based, to a very large extent, on studies of mice which have an immunologic defect determined by the xid gene. This X chromosome gene, when present in the hemizygous or homozygous state, leads to a series of B lymphocyte abnormalities among which are unresponsiveness to soluble polysaccharides and other type 2 antigens,1 depressed serum IgM and IgG3 concentrations,2 and failure of B lymphocytes to proliferate upon stimulation with anti-immunoglobulin (Ig) antibodies.3 Mice with the xid defect lack B lymphocytes which bear the Lyb3,4 Lyb5,5 Lyb7,6 and Ia.W397 antigens. These lymphocytes, which are found in all normal strains, will be referred to as Lyb5+ B lymphocytes. The defects of xid-mice can be accounted for by the absence of Lyb5+ B cells.

Keywords

Mycosis Fungoides Tritiated Thymidine Thymidine Uptake Distinct Regulatory Mechanism Cell Density Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • William E. Paul
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Anthony L. DeFranco
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Kenji Nakanishi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Elizabeth S. Raveche
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • John Farrar
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Maureen Howard
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Laboratory of ImmunologyNIAIDBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Experimental PathologyNIADDKDBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Laboratory of Microbiology and ImmunologyNIDRBethesdaUSA
  4. 4.National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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