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Role of Hydrolases and Glutathione S-Transferases in Insecticide Resistance

  • Walter C. Dauterman

Abstract

During the last few decades, many species of insects have acquired resistance to insecticides. Resistance is inherited and has proved to be one of the major obstacles in the successful contol of insects. Factors recognized to contribute to insecticide resistance include changes in the rate of metabolism, decreased cuticular penetration of the insecticide, and modifications in the target site (Oppenoorth, 1971: Oppenoorth and Welling, 1976).

Keywords

Insecticide Resistance Methyl Iodide Methyl Parathion Nonspecific Esterase Mercapturic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter C. Dauterman
    • 1
  1. 1.Toxicology Program, Department of EntomologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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