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Suppression of Resistance Through Synergistic Combinations with Emphasis on Planthoppers and Leafhoppers Infesting Rice in Japan

  • Kozaburo Ozaki

Abstract

Resistance of insect pests to insecticides has been increasingly a worldwide problem, especially with regard to the major insect pests of a country’s main crops. Such major insect pests have developed resistance due to exposure to the specific insecticides used for controlling them. Examples include parathion resistance in the rice stemborer, Chilo suppressalis Walker, and malathion resistance in both the green rice leafhopper, Nephotettix cinotioeps Uhler, and the smaller brown planthopper, Laodelphax stviatellus Fallen. These phenomena are generally considered to be related to the amount of parathion or malathion previously applied (Kimura, 1965; Ozaki, 1962, 1966; Yokoyama and Ozaki, 1968). On the other hand, the possibility exists that these insect pests might have multifarious genes.

Keywords

Insecticide Resistance Methyl Parathion Carbamate Insecticide Piperonyl Butoxide Ehime Prefecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kozaburo Ozaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Kagawa Agricultural Experiment StationFuchu BranchSakaide, Kagawa-ken 762Japan

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