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Ionic Mechanisms of Soot Formation

  • H. F. Calcote
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 7)

Abstract

In a recent review1 of soot nucleation mechanisms it was demonstrated that mechanisms based upon neutral free radical species are inadequate to explain soot formation in flames. Either rates are too slow to account for the rapid rate of soot formation or there are difficulties in accounting for the large numbers of polycyclic rings observed in soot particles. These problems can be overcome by assuming an ionic mechanism. Ion molecule reactions are extremely fast compared to free radical reactions and ions have a propensity to quickly rearrange to the most stable structure so that there is no difficulty in accounting for the observed polycylcic structures. Much evidence has accumulated in the literature indicating the importance of ions in sooting flames and a number of workers have previously suggested ionic mechanisms. For this, the reader is referred to a recent review.1

Keywords

Equivalence Ratio Proton Affinity Soot Particle Diffusion Flame Premix Flame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. F. Calcote
    • 1
  1. 1.AeroChem Research Laboratories, Inc.PrincetonUSA

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