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Oestrogen and Progestin Receptors as Markers for the Behaviour of Human Breast Tumours

  • R. J. B. King
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 57)

Abstract

It has now been established that most actions of steroid hormones are mediated by intracellular protein receptors. The steroid combines with an extranuclear receptor and the complex translocates to the nucleus where further biochemical changes are initiated. The presence of this receptor machinery is characteristic of cells capable of responding to that steroid whereas the absence of detectable receptor indicates hormone insensitivity1. These principles have been applied clinically to determine the hormone sensitivity of tumours of the endometrium2,3, prostate4,5, kidney6, white blood cells7,8 and breast9. It has also been suggested that oestrogen receptor (RE) analysis may be useful for tumours like malignant melanoma10, pancreas11, ovary12 and colorectal cancer13. It should be stressed that the RE levels are very low in the latter types of tumour and their prognostic significance has not been proven. Most data are available for breast cancer and this article will be devoted to that topic.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Oestrogen Receptor Progesterone Receptor Human Breast Cancer Advanced Breast Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. B. King
    • 1
  1. 1.Hormone Biochemistry DepartmentImperial Cancer Research FundLondonUK

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