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Regulation of Cytidine Uptake in Ehrlich Ascites Tumour Cells

  • Klaus Ring
  • Ulrich Zabel
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 57)

Abstract

Cunningham and Pardee (1969) have described that dialyzed serum is able to stimulate the uptake of uridine in contact-inhibited 3T3 cells. Since then, a large number of studies have been published to describe the effect of hormones, cyclic nucleotides, lectins and viral transformation on the uptake of nucleosides and other nutrients (for reviews see Plagemann and Richey, 1974; Wohlhueter and Plagemann, 1980; Plagemann and Wohlhueter, 1980). In most of these studies, the control mechanism investigated was based on the regulation of de novo formation or breakdown of the proteins presumably involved in nucleoside uptake, i. e. the transmembrane transport catalyzing carrier, and the nucleoside kinase which phosphorylates, and thereby traps, the substrate within the cell.

Keywords

Cytosine Arabinoside High Substrate Concentration Nucleoside Transport Ehrlich Ascites Tumour Cell Transport Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus Ring
    • 1
  • Ulrich Zabel
    • 1
  1. 1.Zentrum der Biologischen Chemie, Abteilung für Mikrobiologische ChemieUniversität FrankfurtFrankfurt-70Germany

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