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Richard H. Beinecke and Bertram S. Brown

  • Richard H. Beinecke
  • Bertram S. Brown

Abstract

Proposals for National Health Insurance have been introduced yearly in every session of Congress since 1939. During the 95th and 96th Congress (1979–1980), at least 16 unique bills were submitted by members of the House and Senate. During 1978–1980, four congressional committees (House Ways and Means and Interstate and Foreign Commerce, Senate Finance and Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research) held at least 15 days of hearings on the subject. Despite this great amount of effort, the United States is probably no nearer to having a comprehensive and coherent national health insurance system now than when the idea was first presented. Two major steps have been the passage of Medicare and Medicaid. However, developing an adequate relationship between these two programs has blocked more progress. Although the Republican party now controls the Senate and the White House and although some persons hope that a form of national health insurance may now be enacted, the history of NHI under both Democratic and Republican administrations suggests that the chances of agreement on a comprehensive NHI proposal are minimal.

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Health Service Mental Health Care National Health Insurance Private Health Insurance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard H. Beinecke
    • 1
  • Bertram S. Brown
    • 2
  1. 1.Horizon Health Group, Inc.USA
  2. 2.Hahnemann UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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