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Structural Family Therapy

  • John B. Rosenberg

Abstract

In the relatively brief 25 to 30 year history of family therapy, eight theoretical approaches have emerged (Kaslow, 1981).1 Although each struggles to claim its uniqueness, a thorough examination of the various schools suggests much in common among them. All, for example, clearly subscribe to a systems approach and most would seem to begin family therapy with a focus on the presenting symptom (Wynne, in Gurman & Kniskern, 1981). On the other hand, each approach has contributed significantly to the body of information concerning theory and technique in understanding and working with troubled families. Although a combination of approaches utilizing an integrative approach has been advocated by some (Duhl & Duhl, 1981; Kaslow, 1981; Lazarus, 1981; Stanton, 198la) in order to cull the best of the various schools, it is first imperative that one familiarize oneself with each theoretical orientation. The purpose of this chapter is to help the reader to understand fully and feel at home with the theory and technique developed within the school known as Structural Family Therapy. Case histories will be presented along with actual transcripts from early diagnostic sessions to illustrate just how one approaches a family from the structural perspective.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Family Therapy Present Problem Initial Session Marital Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • John B. Rosenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Philadelphia Child Guidance ClinicPhiladelphiaUSA

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