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Research on Marital and Family Therapy

Answers, Issues, and Recommendations for the Future
  • Thomas C. Todd
  • M. Duncan Stanton

Abstract

This chapter has been written with both clinicians and reseachers in mind. Regarding the former, we believe that it is important for the practicing clinician or clinical student to know what conclusions safely can be drawn from existing research on marital and family therapy and to know which areas are still speculative as far as research evidence is concerned. We also will raise a number of design issues in the belief that clinicians need to be sophisticated consumers of journal articles and research. Finally, we recognize that nonresearchers are often in a position to have an important influence on future research.

Keywords

Family Therapy Psychotherapy Research Marital Therapy Functional Family Therapy Multiple Outcome Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas C. Todd
    • 1
  • M. Duncan Stanton
    • 2
  1. 1.Harlem Valley Psychiatric Center and Philadelphia Child Guidance ClinicPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Philadelphia Child Guidance ClinicPhiladelphiaUSA

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