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Issues of Divorce in Family Therapy

  • Stanley N. Cohen
  • F. Nolan Jones

Abstract

As we enter the mid-1980s, it should come as no surprise that divorce, or marital dissolution as it is now commonly called, has become a “fact of life” in American society. The upsurge in the use of divorce as a means out of a dissatisfying marriage has been dramatic over the past 20 years. The number of divorces stood at 413,000 in 1962, and it doubled 10 years later. Since 1975, over one million divorces have been recorded annually (National Center for Health Statistics, 1981).

Keywords

Family Therapy Family Conflict Child Support Single Parent Family Marital Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley N. Cohen
    • 1
  • F. Nolan Jones
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryThe Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA
  2. 2.Clackamas County Family Court ServiceOregon CityUSA

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