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Multiple Family Group Therapy

A Model for All Families
  • Paula Hollins Gritzer
  • Helen S. Okun

Abstract

Multiple Family Group Therapy (MFGT) is a combination of family and group psychotherapy in which several families meet simultaneously at agreed upon intervals with therapists present. In this marriage between two recognized and established treatment modalities, the therapists fill an important role as creators, catalysts, and organizers. The special MFGT structure is one in which adults meet with children, families with other families, and members of one generation with those of another generation. The therapist’s selection criteria can include families whose system structures are similar (homogenous), families whose system structures are different (heterogenous), families that are intact or single parent, and families that are intergenerational or nuclear. Through the application of a family systems approach within a group therapy format, the therapeutic process is accelerated and enriched.

Keywords

Group Psychotherapy Family Therapy Psychiatric Hospital Group Process Family System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paula Hollins Gritzer
    • 1
  • Helen S. Okun
    • 1
  1. 1.BrooklynUSA

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