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Behavioral Marital Therapy

  • Gayla Margolin

Abstract

The emergence of behavioral marital therapy, approximately 13 years ago, drew attention primarily for the innovative and distinctive treatment procedures that were introduced. Similar to other theoretical perspectives, behavior therapy originally was applied to a variety of individual problems. Only later, in response to what was perceived as the needs of clients, was it deemed a viable treatment option for marital problems. What behavior marital therapy offered in its early stages of development was a set of orderly, step-by-step procedures for intervening into the complicated, and difficult-to-treat world of marital conflict. Behavior marital therapy’s promise for the future was an even more precise technology in which there would be treatment “modules” matched to specific target problems. Although welcomed by some for its precise, systematic, and time-limited technology, this approach was attacked by others for being overly rational, task-oriented, and narrow in focus.

Keywords

Family Therapy Marital Satisfaction Behavioral Assessment Marital Conflict Communication Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gayla Margolin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology—SGM 923University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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