Advertisement

Family Therapy as a Theory of Roles and Values

  • Charles P. Barnard

Abstract

In the January 1980 AAMFT Newsletter, Dr. Ben Ard provided the first of five interviews with what were called “seminal theorists in the field of marital & family therapy.” Dr. Gerald Zuk was the first of these “seminal theorists” to be interviewed. As part of this interview, Dr. Zuk was asked: “This next question may be presumptuous, but if many years from now people look back on the work of Gerald Zuk in the field of marital and family therapy, what would you most like to be remembered for?” (Ard, 1980, p. 5). Dr. Zuk’s answer identified six concepts, basic to his orientation, as what he regards as his most valuable contributions. He states that these concepts were derived from and “fundamentally grounded in observation in therapy” (Ard, 1980, p. 5). Although Zuk’s ideas initially did emanate from his clinical experience, there is recent evidence from research documenting the presence and efficacy of most of his work (Garrigan & Bambrick, 1975, 1977a,b, 1979).

Keywords

Family Therapy Family Therapist Emotional Expressiveness Role Function Silence Mechanism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ard, B. In focus: Gerald Zuk. AAMFT Newsletter, January 1980, pp. 1–6.Google Scholar
  2. Barnard, C. P. Families, alcholism and therapy. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C. Thomas, 1981. (a)Google Scholar
  3. Barnard, C. P. Elements of family therapy: Drs. Carl Whitaker and Alberto Serrano. (Videotapes and Monograph) Menomonie, Wisc.: University of Wisconsin-Stout, 1981. (b)Google Scholar
  4. Barnard, C. P., Corrales, R. G. The theory and technique of family therapy. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C. Thomas, 1979.Google Scholar
  5. Beavers, W. R. A systems model of family for family therapists. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 1981, 7, 299–307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Boszormenyi-Nagy, I., Spark, G. Invisible loyalties. New York: Harper Row, 1973.Google Scholar
  7. Carrigan, J. J., Bambrick, A. F. Short-term family therapy with emotionally disturbed children. Journal of Marriage and Family Counseling, 1975, I, 379–385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Carrigan, J. J., Bambrick, A. F. Family therapy for disturbed children: Some experimental results in special education. Journal of Marriage and Family Counseling, 1977, 3, 83–93. (a)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Carrigan, J. J., Bambrick, A. F. Introducing novice therapists to “go-between” techniques of family therapy. “ Family Process”, 1977, 16, 237–246. (b)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Carrigan, J. J., Bambrick, A. F. New findings in research on go-between process. International Journal of Family Therapy, 1979, 1, 76–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Jackson, D. D. Family rules: Marital quid pro quo. Archives of General Psychiatry, 1965, 12, 589–594. Laing, R. D. Mystification, confusion and conflict. In I. Boszormenyi-Nagy J. Framo (Eds.), Intensive family therapy: Theoretical and practical aspects. New York: Harper Row, 1965.Google Scholar
  12. Lewis, J., Colleagues. No single thread: Pyschological health in family systems. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1976.Google Scholar
  13. Palazzoli, M. S., Colleagues. Paradox and counterparadox. New York: Aronson, 1978.Google Scholar
  14. Trotzer, J. P. The centrality of values in families and family therapy. International Journal of Family Therapy, 1981, 3, 42–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Zuk, G. H. A further study of laughter in family therapy. Family Process, 1964, 3, 77–89. Zuk, G. H. The go-between process in family therapy. Family Process, 1966, 5, 162–178.Google Scholar
  16. Zuk, G. H. Family therapy. In Jay Haley (Ed.), Changing families New York: Grune Stratton, 1971. Zuk, G. H. Process and practice in family therapy. Haverford, Pa.: Psychiatry and Behavioral Science BooksGoogle Scholar
  17. Zuk, G. H. Process and Practice in Family Therapy.Haverford,Pa.:Psychiatry and Behavioral Science Books,1975.Google Scholar
  18. Zuk, G. H. Family therapy: Clinical hodgepodge or clinical science? Journal of Marriage and Family Counseling, 1976, 2, 299–303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Zuk, G. H. Values and family therapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, research and practice, 1978, 15, 48–55. Zuk, G. H. Value systems and psychopathology in family therapy. International Journal of Family Therapy, 1979, 1, 133–151.Google Scholar
  20. Zuk, G. H. Family therapy for the “truncated” nuclear family. International Journal of Family Therapy, 1980, 2, 183–199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Zuk, G. H. Style of relating as pathogenic relating: A family case study. International Journal of Family Therapy, 1981, 3, 16–28. (a)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Zuk, G. H. Family therapy: A triadic based approach (Rev. ed.). New York: Human Sciences Press, 1981. (b)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles P. Barnard
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Education and Human ServicesUniversity of Wisconsin-StoutMenomonieUSA

Personalised recommendations