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Marriage and Parenthood

The Changing Scene
  • Benjamin B. Wolman

Abstract

Institutions based on subjugation usually have been more stable than those based on equal rights. Those who subjugate are unmistakably conservative, and social inequality always has been associated with continuous efforts to preserve the status quo. Privileged classes and/or individuals oppose change; thus, slavery always has claimed more stability than freedom.

Keywords

Married Couple Change Scene Wife Abuse Primitive Society Marital Partner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin B. Wolman
    • 1
  1. 1.International Encyclopedia of Psychiatry, Psychology, Psychoanalysis, and NeurologyNew YorkUSA

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