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Ethanol and the Central Nervous System

  • Walter A. Hunt

Abstract

The effect of ethanol on the central nervous system is most certainly the first to be recognized. Since it was discovered that putting fruit and grain in water in the warm sun produced a drink whose consumption resulted in pleasant feelings, alcoholic beverages have been an integral part of many cultures. It is the pharmacological effects of ethanol on the brain that make necessary this book and the expanding research in the area of alcoholism.

Keywords

Cyclic Nucleotide Ethanol Consumption Chronic Ethanol Ethanol Treatment Intermediary Metabolism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter A. Hunt
    • 1
  1. 1.Behavioral Sciences DepartmentArmed Forces Radiobiology Research InstituteBethesdaUSA

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