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Prevention of Alcohol Abuse

  • Peter M. Miller
  • Ted D. Nirenberg
  • Gary McClure

Abstract

The abuse of alcohol presents a major, widespread health problem in the United States. Intervention aimed at modifying abusive drinking patterns has centered around treatment and rehabilitation programs, which have been developed primarily for middle-aged and older chronic alcoholics. For example, the median age of clients in treatment centers sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism is 45 years (Armor, Polich, & Stambul, 1976). More recently treatment has focused on younger and more diverse groups such as women, teenagers, and minority groups.

Keywords

Alcohol Consumption Alcohol Abuse Alcoholic Beverage Drinking Behavior Alcoholic Anonymous 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Miller
    • 1
  • Ted D. Nirenberg
    • 2
  • Gary McClure
    • 3
  1. 1.Sea Pines Behavioral InstituteSea Pines PlantationHilton Head IslandUSA
  2. 2.Psychological ServicesVeterans Administration Medical CenterProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyGeorgia Southern CollegeStatesboroUSA

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