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Alcoholism Treatment Approaches

Patient Variables, Treatment Variables
  • Barbara S. McCrady
  • Kenneth J. Sher

This chapter is organized into four major sections. In the first section, a brief critical review of the alcoholism treatment outcome literature is provided, in which particular attention is paid to the limitations of evaluating heterogeneous patients and treatment. In Section 2, the focus is on three major alcoholism treatment models: Alcoholics Anonymous, behavior therapy, and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy. The ways in which these three models treat biological, individual, and interpersonal problems of patients are presented. In Section 3, the discussion turns to a consideration of patient variables in treatment, using three illustrative special patient populations—the elderly, women, and the psychiatrically impaired alcohol abuser. For each population, biological, individual, and interpersonal treatment implications are presented. Section 4 examines the research and treatment implications of studying specific patient-variable-treatment-interventions interactions.

Keywords

Affective Disorder Drinking Behavior Alcohol Problem Problem Drinker Behavioral Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara S. McCrady
    • 1
  • Kenneth J. Sher
    • 2
  1. 1.Brown University and Butler HospitalProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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