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Alcohol Use and Abuse

Historical Perspective and Present Trends
  • Glenn R. Caddy

Abstract

Those engaged in scientific pursuits only occasionally cast themselves in the role of social activists; yet, as Koestler (1968) so clearly articulated, the contributions made by scientists and thinkers on the leading edge of a conceptual development typically have profound social and political implications. The social context, however, must be ready to accept the emerging perspectives or social acceptance will not occur (see also Kuhn, 1970).

Keywords

Alcohol Consumption Quarterly Journal Alcohol Dependence Alcohol Problem Problem Drinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glenn R. Caddy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNova UniversityFort LauderdaleUSA

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