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Prolactin and Casein Gene Expression in the Mammary Cell

  • Louis-Marie Houdebine
  • Jean Djiane
  • Bertrand Teyssot
  • Jean-Luc Servely
  • Claude Delouis
  • Michèle Ollivier-Bousquet
  • Eve Devinoy
  • Paul A. Kelly
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

The onset of milk synthesis and secretion is the result of complex and multiple processes which operate during pregnancy and at parturition. Before pregnancy, the mammary gland is restricted to a few duct cells. During pregnancy, under the influence of estrogens, progesterone, and growth factors, the secretory cells progressively appear. They are organized in an epithelium forming a large number of alveoli. At the end of pregnancy, many alveolar cells are present and the development of the mammary gland is more or less complete according to species. After parturition, when milk secretion is triggered, the alveolar cells become polarized and hypertrophic. This transformation corresponds to the activation of the cells which have to elaborate and secrete huge amounts of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates throughout lactation. Thus before being fully active, the mammary gland has been subjected to at least three types of transformation: (1) a cell multiplication which leads to the formation of alveoli, (2) an activation of specific genes directly involved in the elaboration of milk, and (3) an organization of the alveolar cells which become enriched in cellular organelles involved in the bulky production and secretion of milk. After weaning, the alveolar cells disappear until the next pregnancy.

Keywords

Mammary Gland Transcription Rate Alveolar Cell Prolactin Receptor Casein Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis-Marie Houdebine
    • 1
  • Jean Djiane
    • 1
  • Bertrand Teyssot
    • 1
  • Jean-Luc Servely
    • 1
  • Claude Delouis
    • 1
  • Michèle Ollivier-Bousquet
    • 1
  • Eve Devinoy
    • 1
  • Paul A. Kelly
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Physiologie de la Lactation, Institut National de la Recherche AgronomiqueC.N.R.Z.Jouy-en-JosasFrance
  2. 2.Département d’Endocrinologie MoléculaireCentre Hospitalier de I’ Université LavalQuebecCanada

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