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Representation of Biosonar Information in the Auditory Cortex of the Mustached Bat, with Emphasis on Representation of Target Velocity Information

  • Nobuo Suga
  • Hideto Niwa
  • Ikuo Taniguchi
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 56)

Abstract

Since reviews have already appeared on the research carried out in this laboratory on the peripheral auditory system (e.g., Suga, 1978) and the auditory cortex of the mustached bat, Pteronotus parnellii rubiginosus (e.g., Suga, 1978, 1980, 1981a, 1982; Suga et al., 1981), and since several papers containing a large amount of data obtained during the last five years are in press (Suga and Manabe, 1982; O’Neill and Suga, 1982), we will not attempt another comprehensive review. Rather, we shall summarize the echolocation system of the mustached bat as we have come to understand it, and will present the unpublished data which are related to neural representation of target-velocity information in the auditory cortex.

Keywords

Auditory Cortex Tone Burst Primary Auditory Cortex Good Frequency Wing Beat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuo Suga
    • 1
  • Hideto Niwa
    • 1
  • Ikuo Taniguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyWashington UniversitySt. LouisUSA

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