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Localization of Acoustic Signals in the Owl

  • Masakazu Konishi
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 56)

Abstract

Since the nervous system is designed to control behavior, the ultimate goal of neurobiology is the explanation of behavior. The design features of the nervous system must reflect the life style of each species. This is the fundamental tenet of neuroetholoy. It follows that the choice of topics, animals and methods in neurobiological studies cannot be arbitrary with respect to the animal’s behavior. The behavioral as well as the neurophysiological method of study should exploit or be appropriate for the animal’s life style. The most important practical problem is to design both behavioral experiments which reveal the attributes of the underlying neural mechanisms and physiological experiments which are relevant to the behavior under study. We shall discuss below how we tackled the above problem in our study of sound localization in the barn owl (Tyto alba).

Keywords

Receptive Field Sound Source Sound Localization Interaural Time Difference Auditory Space 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masakazu Konishi
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of BiologyCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA

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