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Cellular Uptake, Excretion and Localization of Hematoporphyrin Derivative (HPD)

  • Michael W. Berns
  • Alan Wile
  • Anton Dahlman
  • Fred Johnson
  • Robert Burns
  • Daryn Sperling
  • Mark Guiltinan
  • Ann Siemens
  • Robert Walter
  • Marie Hammer-Wilson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 160)

Abstract

Considerable progress has been made towards the development of hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) plus light as an effective modality in the management of cancer. Recent work in this field largely has been conducted by Dougherty and his colleagues (1–4). Although the method appears to have great potential as a therapeutic modality, many questions are still unanswered. For example, the active ingredients in the HPD solution have not been determined. In addition, the question of whether or not the binding of the HPD and/or its individual subfractions to the outside of the cell and/ or to various regions and organelles inside the cell has not been successfully resolved (5–10). The precise mode of cytotoxicity is still unresolved and the mechanism of selective retention by tumor tissue is not understood (10–14).

Keywords

Cellular Uptake Fluorescence Pattern Hematoporphyrin Derivative Photodynamic Inactivation Single Mitochondrion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael W. Berns
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alan Wile
    • 2
  • Anton Dahlman
    • 2
  • Fred Johnson
    • 3
  • Robert Burns
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daryn Sperling
    • 1
  • Mark Guiltinan
    • 1
  • Ann Siemens
    • 1
  • Robert Walter
    • 1
  • Marie Hammer-Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Developmental and Cell BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  3. 3.Department of PhysicsCalifornia State UniversityFullertonUSA

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