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Preclinical Evaluation of Hematoporphyrin Derivative for the Treatment of Intraocular Tumors: A Preliminary Report

  • Charles J. Gomer
  • Bernard C. Szirth
  • Daniel R. Doiron
  • James V. Jester
  • Robert W. Lingua
  • Corey Mark
  • William F. Benedict
  • A. Linn Murphree
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 160)

Abstract

Treatment modalities such as external beam radiation therapy, cobalt plaques, photocoagulation or cryotherapy for preservation of useful vision in patients with ocular tumors offer only limited success. In many cases enucleation is necessary in order to prevent tumor spread (1). The accessibility of intraocular tumors to visible light and the excellent optical properties of the eye suggest that hemato-porphyrin derivative photoradiation therapy (HPD PRT) may prove to be an important advancement in the successful management of intraocular and periocular malignancies. Due to the extreme sensitivity of the eye to light and the possible loss of vision resulting from non-repairable damage to normal ocular structures, we are performing preclinical studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of HPD PRT as a primary clinical modality for treating ocular tumors.

Keywords

Anterior Chamber Fluorescein Angiography Preclinical Evaluation Acute Toxicity Study Choroidal Malignant Melanoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles J. Gomer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Bernard C. Szirth
    • 1
    • 3
  • Daniel R. Doiron
    • 3
  • James V. Jester
    • 1
  • Robert W. Lingua
    • 1
  • Corey Mark
    • 2
    • 3
  • William F. Benedict
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. Linn Murphree
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of OphthalmologyUniversity of Southern California School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Division of Hematology OncologyUniversity of Southern California School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Clayton Center for Ocular OncologyChildren’s Hospital of Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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