Extrinsic Regulation of Macrophage Function by Lymphokines — Effect of Lymphokines on the Stimulated Oxidative Metabolism of Macrophages

  • Edgar Pick
  • Yael Bromberg
  • Maya Freund
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 155)

Abstract

Macrophage function is subject to multifactorial regulation, the details of which are only partially understood. The main determinants are: the stage of cell differentiation (maturation), the tissue localization, and the acute or chronic exposure to soluble or cellular elements interacting with the macrophage membrane. This last category is composed of a large number of unrelated agents and includes immunoglobulins, complement components, clotting factors, hormones and neurotransmitters, serum-derived lipoproteins and anti-proteases, bacterial products and, of special relevance to this presentation, lymphokines. Macrophages are also subject to autoregulatory influences by such products as oxygen radicals, prostaglandins (and other arachidonate metabolites), complement components and interferon.

Keywords

Lipase Tuberculosis Adenosine Interferon Prostaglandin 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edgar Pick
    • 1
  • Yael Bromberg
    • 1
  • Maya Freund
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Immunology Department of Human Microbiology Sackler School of MedicineTel-Aviv UniversityTel-AvivIsrael

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