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Membrane Receptors and the Regulation of Mononuclear Phagocyte Effector Functions

  • Samuel C. Silverstein
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 155)

Abstract

Mononuclear phagocytes form a body-wide system of cells (1) that originate from precursors in the bone marrow, circulate in the blood, and emigrate from the vascular compartment into the tissues where they spend the major portion of their life span. At the time of their emigration from the blood into the tissues mononuclear phagocytes are extremely immature cells. In the tissues they differentiate into their adult form, the macrophage. Macrophages in different tissues develop characteristic metabolic and structural properties. Thus alveolar macrophages develop a high capacity for oxidative metabolites (2), while splenic and peritoneal macrophages derive the major proportion of their metabolic energy from anerobic glycolysis (3). Inflammatory macrophages may develop into sheets of interlocking epithelioid cells, or fuse to form multinucleate giant cells (4). In the bones they fuse to produce osteoclasts (5).

Keywords

Alveolar Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Membrane Receptor Mononuclear Phagocyte Arachidonic Acid Metabolite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel C. Silverstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and ImmunologyRockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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