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The Concept of Morphogenic Competence with Reference to Anther and Pollen Culture

  • Norman Sunderland
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 22)

Abstract

A morphogenically competent cell may be defined as one which has the potential or acquires the potential in vitro to develop as embryo, callus or other structure given appropriate cultural conditions. Most tissue culturists probably regard competence mainly as a property of culture and one that is acquired and regulated by the particular combination and concentration of hormones included in the medium. In this paper I propose to query this assumption and to put the case that (a) competence may be more readily induced before culture, and (b) expression of that competence is dependent as much upon endogenous as upon exogenous factors. Pollen will be used to illustrate this theme because of the ease with which competent cells can be recognized in suitably stained squash preparations of anthers. I shall refer mainly to the peonies and barley, since these are the two groups of plants in which I first encountered competent cells in vivo, a phenomenon subsequently referred to as pollen dimorphism (1).

Keywords

Anther Culture Pollen Culture Mature Anther Endogenous Hormone Level Shed Pollen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Sunderland
    • 1
  1. 1.John Innes InstituteNorwichUK

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