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Water Regimes and Water Rights Doctrines

  • Ronald W. Tank

Abstract

The law of water rights embraces several diametrically opposing doctrines and numerous modifications and combinations of these doctrines. Different rules and hypotheses have been established for distinct classes and different geographic occurrences of water in an effort to isolate and scale down conflicts and to allow for flexibility in dealing with different environments and changing societal needs and attitudes. In this chapter we will consider the various water regimes and some of the fundamental legal doctrines that pertain to water rights.

Keywords

Ground Water Water Regime Hydrologic Cycle Hydrologic Environment Total Water Supply 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Suggested Reading

  1. Dewsnup, R. (1971), Assembling water rights for a new use: Needed reforms in the law, Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Institute, Proceedings, Vol. 17, pp. 613–656.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald W. Tank
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence UniversityAppletonUSA

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