Bases for Concern Chairman’s Comments

  • Nemat O. Borhani
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (volume 6)


Welcome to the first session of the afternoon of this symposium on Genetic Toxicology: An Agricultural Perspective. Three excellent topics on urban and rural patterns of cancer incidence, cancer risks associated with agriculture, and extrapolation of mutagenicity testing to man will be presented during this session by a panel of distinguished investigators. All these, in one way or another, deal with application of epidemiological tools in our scientific endeavors in this field. As an epidemiologist, I would like to make a few remarks for a brief introduction.


Organochlorine Pesticide Cholinesterase Activity Control Management System Agricultural Industry Organophosphate Pesticide 


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  1. 1.
    Schull, W. J. and Weiss, A. M., Genetic Epidemiology, Four Strategies: Epidemiologic Review, Vol. II, pp 1–18, 1980.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Maclure, A. M. and MacMahon B., An Epidemiologic Perspectives of Environmental Carcinogenesis: Epidemiologic Review, Vol. II, pp. 19–48, 1980.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    IARC: Some Organochlorine Pesticides Monograph, Vol. V, 1974.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Epstein, S. S., The Carcinogenicity of Organochlorine Pesticides, in: Origins of Human Cancer. Hiatt, Watson and Winston, (eds.) Cold Sspring Harbor Laboratory, Book A, pp. 243–265, 1977.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kraus, J. F., Richards, D. M., Borhani, N. O., Mull, R., Kilgore, W., and Winterlin, W., Physiological Responses to Organophosphate Residue in Field Workers. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Vol. V, pp. 471–485, 1977.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nemat O. Borhani
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Community HealthUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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