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Field Emission Studies of Surface Diffusion of Adsorbates

  • Robert Gomer
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSB, volume 86)

Abstract

The field emission microscope, invented by E. W. Müller in 1937, has proved to be remarkably useful for studying the diffusion of adsorbed atoms or molecules on metal surfaces. Two quite distinct but complementary ways of using it for this purpose exist, namely shadowing and the measurement of current fluctuations. The former provides information on overall diffusion behavior in a very graphic way; the latter focuses more narrowly on diffusion under very well-defined conditions on a single crystal plane. This article will give a very brief review of the salient features of the field emission microscope, describe the shadowing and fluctuation methods, and will present some results obtained with them. These, more than any discussion, will give the reader a feeling for the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods.

Keywords

Work Function Surface Diffusion Boundary Diffusion Trap Site Sticking Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Gomer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and The James Franck InstituteThe University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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