Advertisement

Molecular Mechanisms of Multistage Carcinogenesis

  • I. Bernard Weinstein
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 52)

Abstract

The subject of chemical carcinogenesis is an exciting one for at least three reasons. One, it deals with a disease of major magnitude. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and the Western World. Two, it probes some of the most fundamental questions in contemporary biology, i.e. questions related to DNA structure, chromatin and the control of gene expression, membrane structure and function, the very basic problem of growth control and the specificity and stability of cellular differentiation. Three it brings together investigators from such diverse disciplines as epidemiology, toxicology, cell biology and molecular genetics.

Keywords

Phorbol Ester Gene Rearrangement Tumor Promoter Mouse Skin Chemical Carcinogen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    H. H. Hiatt and J. D. Watson (eds): “Origins of Human Cancer, Cold Spring Harbor Conferences on Cell Proliferation,” Cold Spring Labs, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (1977).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    IARC Monographs, Supplement 1 “Chemicals and Industrial Processes Associated with Cancer in Humans,” International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France (1979).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    E. Miller, Cancer Res. 38: 1479 (1978).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    I. B. Weinstein, in: S. Crooke and A. Prestayko (eds), “Cancer and Chemotherapy Vol. 1, Introduction to Neoplasia and Anti–Neoplastic Chemotherapy,” pp. 169–196, Academic Press, New York (1980).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    H. Gelboin and P.O.P. Ts’o (eds), “Polycylic Hydrocarbons and Cancer, Vol. 1 and 2,” Academic Press, New York (1978).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    B. Singer and B. Kroger, Prog. in Nucleic Acid Res. and Mol. Biol. 23:151 (1979).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    D. Grunberger and I. B. Weinstein, in: P. L. Grover (ed), “Chemical Carcinogens and DNA,” p. 59, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida (1979).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    D. Grunberger and I. B. Weinstein, in: W. Cohen (ed), Prog. in Nucleic Acid Res. and Mol. Biol, Vol 23, pp 105–149, Academic Press, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    I. B. Weinstein, R. A. Mufson, L. S. Lee, P. B. Fisher, J. Laskin, A. Horowitz and V. Ivanovic, in: B. Pullman, P.O.P. Ts’o and H. Gelboin (eds), “Carcinogenesis: Fundamental Mechanisms and Environmental Effects,” pp 543–563, R. Reidel Pub. Co., Amsterdam, Holland (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    A. M. Jeffrey, T. Kinoshita, R. M. Santella, D. Grunberger, L. Katz and I. B. Weinstein, in: B. Pullman, P.O.P. Ts’o and H. Gelboin (eds), “Carcinogenesis: Fundamental Mechanisms and Environmental Effects,” pp 565–579, R. Reidel Pub. Co., Amsterdam, Holland (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    A. H. Wang, G. J. Quigley, F. J. Kolpak, J. L. Cranford, J. A. Van Boom, G. Vander Macel and A. Rich, Nature, 282: 680 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    E. Sage and M. Leng, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sei. USA 77: 4597 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    R. Santella, D. Grunberger, I. B. Weinstein and A. Rich, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78: 1451 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    J. Backer and I. B. Weinstein, Science 209: 297 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    J. A. Allen and M. M. Coombs, Nature 287: 244 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    V. Wunderlich, I. Tetzlaff and A. Graffi, Chemical—Biological Interactions 4:81 (1971/72).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    P. C. Hanawalt, E. C. Friedberg and C. F. Fox (eds), “DNA Repair Mechanisms,” Academic Press, New York (1978).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    V. Ivanovic and I. B. Weinstein, Cancer Res. 40: 3508 (1980).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    I. B. Weinstein, R. A. Mufson, L. S. Lee, P. B. Laskin, A. Horowitz and V. Ivanovic, in: B. Pullman, P. 0. P. Ts’o and H. Gelboin (eds), “Carcinogenesis: Fundamental Mechanisms and Environmental Effects,” pp 543–563, R. Reidel Pub. Co., Amsterdam, Holland (1980).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    G. B. Pierce, R. Shikes and L. M. Fink, “Cancer: A Problem in Developmental Biology,” Prentice–Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1978).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    A. C. Braun, An Epigenetic Model for the Origin of Cancer, Quart. Rev. Biol. 56: 33 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    A. Razin and A. D. Riggs, Science 210: 604 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    T. J. Slaga, A. Sivak and R. K. Boutwell (eds), “Mechanisms of Tumor Promotion and Cocarcinogenesis, Vol. 2,” Raven Press, New York (1978).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    P. B. Fisher, N. I. Goldstein and I. B. Weinstein, Cancer Res. 39: 3051 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    I. Berenblum, in: F. F. Becker (ed), “Cancer,” p. 323, Plenum Press, New York (1975).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    I. B. Weinstein, L. S. Lee, P. B. Fisher, A. Mufson and H. Yamasaki, J. of Supramolecular Struct. 12: 195 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    I. B. Weinstein, in: C. McGrath, M. J. Brennan and M. A. Rich (eds), “Cell Biology of Breast Cancer,” Academic Press, New York (1981).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    L. Diamond, T. G. O’Brien and G. Rovera, Life Sci. 23: 1979 (1978).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    P. E. Driedger and P. M. Blumberg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sei. USA 77: 567 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    K. B. Delclos, D. S. Nagle and P. M. Blumberg, Cell 19: 1025 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    A. D. Horowitz, E. Greenebaum and I. B. Weinstein, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78: 2315 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    M. Shoyab and G. J. Todaro, Nature 288: 451 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    V. Solanki and T. J. Slaga, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78: 2549 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    C. L. Ashendel and R. K. Boutwell, Biochem. Biophys. Res.Commun. 99: 543 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    K. Umezawa, I. B. Weinstein, A. D. Horowitz, H. Fujiki, T. Matsushima and T. Sugimura, Nature 290: 411 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    H. Fujiki, M. Mori, M. Nakayasu, M. Terada, T. Sugimura and R. Moore, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 78: 3872 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    C. Wenner, J. Hackney, H. Kimellog and E. Mayhew, Cancer Res. 34: 1731 (1978).Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    E. Rozengurt, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 339: 175 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    P. B. Fisher and I. B. Weinstein, Carcinogenesis 2: 89 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    W. Troll, G. Witz, B. Goldstein, D. Stone and T. Sugimura, in: E. Hecker (ed), “Cocarcinogens and Biological Effects,” Raven Press, (in press) (1981).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    P. W. Wertz and G. C. Mueller, Proc. Amer. Assoc. Cancer Res. 21: 128 (1980).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    R. A. Mufson, E. Okin and I. B. Weinstein, Carcinogenesis, (in press) (1981).Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol, Vol. 44: Viral Oncogenesis (1981).Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    A. R. Goldberg, K. B. Delclos and P. M. Blumberg, Science 208: 191 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    C. Pietrapaolo, J. Laskin and I. B. Weinstein, Cancer Res. 41: 1565 (1981).Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    V. Ivanovic and I. B. Weinstein, J. Supramolec. Struct. Suppl. 5 (Abstr.) 232 (1981).Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    V. Ivanovic and I. B. Weinstein, Nature 392: 404 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    A. R. Kinsella and M. Radman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 75: 6149 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    H. Nagasawa and J. B. Little, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 76: 1943 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. 50.
    I. Emerit and P. A. Cerutti, Nature 293: 144 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    I. Fridovich, Science 201: 875 (1978).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    P. B. Fisher and I. B. Weinstein, in: R. Montesano, H. Bartsch and L. Tomatis (eds), “Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Carcinogen Screening Tests,” pp. 113–131, Intl. Agency Research on Cancer, Lyon, France (1980).Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    N. Yamamota and H. Zur Hausen, Nature 280: 244 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    R. Seif, J. Virola 36: 421 (1980).Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    R. G. Martin, V. P. Setlow, C. A. Edwards and D. Vembu, Cell 17: 635 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    P. B. Fisher, C. S. H. Young and I. B. Weinstein, and T. H. Carter, Molecular and Cellular Biology 1: 370 (1981).Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    S. K. Arya, Nature 284: 71 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. 58.
    K. Hellman, A. Hellman, Int. J. Cancer 27: 95 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. 59.
    S. Mondal and C. Heidelberg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 65: 219 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. 60.
    A. R. Kennedy, M. Fox, J. Murray and J. B. Little, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77: 7262 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    R. McKay, Nature 287: 188 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. 62.
    I. Herskowitz, L. Blair, D. Forbes, J. Hicks, Y. Kassir, P. Kushner, J. Rine, G. Sprague and J. Strathern, in: T. Leighton and W. F. Loomis (eds), “Molecular Genetics of Development,” Academic Press, New York, (1980).Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    J. Cairns, Nature 289: 353 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. 64.
    C. Shih, L. C. Padhy, M. Murray and R. A. Weinberg, Nature 290: 261 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. 65.
    T. G. Krantiris and G. M. Cooper, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78: 1181 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. 66.
    S. Gattoni, P. Kirschmeier, I. B. Weinstein, J. Escobedo and D. Dina, Molecular and Cellular Biology, (in press) (1981).Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    P. Kirschmeier, S. Gattoni, D. Dina and I. B. Weinstein, (manuscript submitted for publication ) (1981).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Bernard Weinstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Environmental Sciences and Cancer Center/Institute of Cancer ResearchColumbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations