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A STEM Microanalytical Investigation of Nitrogen Implanted Cemented WC-Co

  • J. Greggi
  • R. Kossowsky

Abstract

The surface modification of materials by high fluence ion implantation is rapidly becoming accepted as a potentially important technological process. In fact. recent conferences1,2 and publications3 have emphasized solely this particular application of ion beam technology. Of the numerous surface properties which may be modified by ion implantation, one of the more promising applications occurs in the area of surface hardening for improved wear or fatigue resistance. Hartley4 has recently reviewed the literature in this area, and points out that the most dramatic increases in wear resistance are obtained in the cemented WC-Co composites. Although suggestions have been made by Dearnaley and Hartley5 and Hartley6 to account for this increased wear resistance, no microstructural evidence exists to support these conclusions. Therefore, we have instituted a microstructural and microchemical study of ion implanted cemented WC-Co composites with the ultimate goal of understanding the improved wear resistance in these materials. This paper presents the first results of this study.

Keywords

Carbide Phase Dislocation Substructure Binder Phase Improve Wear Resistance Electron Energy Loss Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    C. M. Preece and J. K. Hirvonen, eds. “Ion Implantation Metallurgy,” The Metallurgical Society of AIME, New York (1980).Google Scholar
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    International Conference on “Modification of the Surface Properties of Metals by Ion Implantation,” UMIST, Manchester, U.K., 23–26 June (1981), to be published.Google Scholar
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    J. K. Hirvonen, ed. “Treatise on Materials Science and Technology,” Vol. 18, Ion Implantation, Academic Press, New York (1980).Google Scholar
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    N.E.W. Hartley, Tribological and Mechanical Properties, in: “Treatise on Materials Science and Technology,” Vol. 18, Ion Implantation, J. K. Hirvonen, ed., Academic Press, New York (1980).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Greggi
    • 1
  • R. Kossowsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Westinghouse R&D CenterPittsburghUSA

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