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Gender Identity and Sex-Role Stereotyping: Clinical Issues in Human Sexuality

  • Rona Klein
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

In our complex society, the physician’s understanding of human sexuality must include an awareness of the sex-role perceptions that serve to shape female and male sexual behaviors. We must realize that, as Luria and Rose (1979) note, “sexual acts are performed in a social context.”

Keywords

Gender Identity Double Standard Human Sexuality Math Anxiety Psychological Androgyny 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rona Klein
    • 1
  1. 1.Stone Center for Developmental Services and StudiesWellesley CollegeWellesleyUSA

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