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Sexual Dysfunctions in the Physically Ill and Disabled

  • Ernest R. Griffith
  • Roberta B. Trieschmann
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Any approach to the treatment of sexual dysfunctions in the physically ill and disabled requires a clear understanding of the distinction between those dysfunctions with an organic etiology and those with a psychogenic etiology during the evaluation of the problem. A delineation of these aspects of dysfunction is essential since treatment strategies will differ. Psychologically based dysfunctions have received the most attention in the literature, and multiple intervention strategies have been developed. Most of the patients seen for treatment by the average sexual counselor have psychogenic dysfunctions, and the patient initiates the referral, usually after suffering with the dysfunction for quite a while.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Sexual Activity Cerebral Palsy Sexual Function Sexual Dysfunction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernest R. Griffith
    • 1
  • Roberta B. Trieschmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Rehabilitation MedicineGood Samaritan Medical CenterPhoenixUSA
  2. 2.PhoenixUSA

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