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The Relationship between Temperature and Velocity in Turbulent Boundary Layers with Injection

  • L. C. Squire

Abstract

The relationship between temperature and velocity in turbulent boundary layers has been of considerable interest ever since the publication of the pioneering papers by Crocco on the corresponding results in laminar flow. As a result a number of authors have derived a simple algebraic form for the relation, the Crocco relation. This simple form has been found to be in close agreement with experimental results over a wide range of conditions although there are a large number of inexplicable discrepancies. This paper reviews the various derivations of the Crocco relation to see if the approximations used break down under certain circumstances. In fact no obvious reasons for the discrepancies have been found. However, it has been possible to extend some of the derivations to boundary-layer flows over porous surfaces and the results are found to be in good agreement with experiment, even in highly nonequilibrium layers, for example, in the boundary layer downstream of a porous surface.

Keywords

Boundary Layer Mach Number Prandtl Number Turbulent Boundary Layer Porous Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. C. Squire
    • 1
  1. 1.Engineering DepartmentCambridge UniversityCambridgeEngland

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