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Involving Children in Decisions Affecting Their Own Welfare

Guidelines for Professionals
  • Lois A. Weithorn
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

The foregoing chapters have provided analyses of legal, psychological, and social issues relevant to children’s “competency” to make decisions affecting their own welfare. Scholars, scientists, and practitioners have focused attention on these issues in response to the courts’ involvement in cases concerning the rights of legal minors to make autonomous decisions. Most publicized have been the United States Supreme Court’s 1979 decisions in the cases of Parham v. J. R.1 and Bellotti v. Baird 2. The first case involved the rights of minors whose parents petition for their admission to psychiatric hospitals. In Bellotti, the Court considered the right of minor females to obtain abortions independent of their parents’ consent.

Keywords

National Commission Legal Standard Parental Judgment United States Supreme Belmont Report 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lois A. Weithorn
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public PolicyUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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