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Preparing Children for Decision Making

Implications of Legal Socialization Research
  • June Louin Tapp
  • Gary B. Melton
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Over the past 20 years, psychologists and legal scholars alike increasingly have recognized the expanding activity of the law (Bermant, Nemeth, & Vidmar, 1976; Konecni & Ebbesen, 1980; Monahan & Loftus, 1982; Sales, 1977; Sarat, 1977; Tapp, 1969, 1976, 1977, 1980). Its role as a primary socializing agent parallel to church, home, and school has been recognized in both the East and the West. With increased recognition of the importance of law and normative ordering, there has been increased study of the acquisition of legal values within and between rule/justice systems (e.g., home, school, union, community) as well as the characteristics of particular legal cultures (e.g., Adelson, 1970, 1971; Friedman, 1971/1977, 1975; Hess & Tapp, 1969; Minturn & Tapp, 1970; Sarat, 1977; Tapp, 1971, 1976). This search has included investigations dealing with the development of legal reasoning patterns and the configuration of legal beliefs (Levine, 1979; Levine & Tapp, 1977; Tapp, 1970, 1974; Tapp & Keniston, 1976; Tapp & Kohlberg, 1971; Tapp & Levine, 1970, 1974, 1977). The reported trends, based on developmental, cross-cultural, and occupational group data, “provide an important key to the structure of legal culture” (Sarat, 1977, p. 453).

Keywords

Moral Judgment Moral Development Civil Liberty Legal Reasoning Legal Concept 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • June Louin Tapp
    • 1
  • Gary B. Melton
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Child DevelopmentUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of NebraskaLincolnUSA

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