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Motivation pp 185-234 | Cite as

Ethological Models of Hierarchy and Patterning of Species-Specific Behavior

  • John C. Fentress

Abstract

When an animal interacts with its environment we commonly observe a variety of action patterns that are in turn combined into higher order functional configurations such as feeding, fighting, mating, grooming, and temperature regulation. How do we describe and classify these individual actions and their rules of connection in time? By what means do we separate intrinsic from extrinsic causal factors but also capture the intimacy of their relations at various levels of behavioral expression? At a still more refined level, how do we evaluate the boundaries that separate different classes of action from one another without losing sight of the fact that activation of any given action may also influence the expression of another? These and related questions have long been a major interest of ethologists.

Keywords

Physiological Psychology Hermit Crab Displacement Activity Limb Segment Behavioral Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C. Fentress
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychology and Biology, Life Sciences CentreDalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada

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