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Motivation pp 67-104 | Cite as

The Role of the Cerebral Cortex and Ascending Activating Systems in the Control of Behavior

  • C. H. Vanderwolf

Abstract

Experiments by Moruzzi and Magoun (1949), Green and Arduini (1954), and many subsequent investigators (French, 1960; Green, 1964; Jasper, 1960; Rossi and Zanchetti, 1957) indicated the existence of diffuse ascending pathways from the brainstem reticular formation which were responsible for producing generalized activation of the neocortex and hippocampus. The mass electrical activity (electroencephalogram, EEG) characteristic of these two types of cortex during activation differed; neocortical activity consisted of small-amplitude fast waves, while hippocampal activity assumed a pattern of near-sinuosoidal rhythmical slow activity (RSA or “theta” rhythm). During nonactivated periods both types of cortex generated irregular wave patterns of large amplitude and low frequency.

Keywords

Cerebral Cortex Physiological Psychology Slow Wave Clinical Neurophysiology Paradoxical Sleep 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. H. Vanderwolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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