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Motivation pp 511-541 | Cite as

The Motivation of Aggression

  • J. W. Renfrew
  • R. R. Hutchinson

Abstract

Progress in the understanding of aggression has been impeded by confusion over just what constitutes aggression, whether it is a unitary phenomenon, and what are the nature and number of its determinants. For almost two decades, we have pursued a line of research that has provided some basic information on the nature of aggression and its determinants and that has resulted in the development of investigative techniques which will facilitate further research in this field. In the present work, we will review previous studies by ourselves and our colleagues, concerning the environmental determinants of aggression, that involved development of definitions of the behavior and of methods to measure them reliably. We will show how the methods have led to the demonstration of two classes of environmental antecedent conditions for aggression. We also will summarize our work on brain mechanisms for aggression that shows how these neural mechanisms parallel those found for situations involving peripheral mechanisms. In addition, we will illustrate how our work on the brain supports and extends the attempts of other investigators to understand the determinants of aggression through the study of brain stimulation effects.

Keywords

Stimulus Onset Brain Stimulation Squirrel Monkey Lateral Hypothalamus Aversive Stimulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Renfrew
    • 1
  • R. R. Hutchinson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorthern Michigan UniversityMarquetteUSA
  2. 2.Foundation for Behavioral ResearchAugustaUSA

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