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Factors Affecting Immunoreactive Thromboxane B2 in Kidney Transplant Patients

  • M. L. Foegh
  • J. F. Winchester
  • M. Zmudka
  • G. B. Helfrich
  • P. W. Ramwell
  • G. E. Schreiner

Abstract

Immune responses involve activation of blood elements such as lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, and platelets. Activation of these cells entail formation of thromboxane A2 TXA2 and other metabolites of arachidonic acid. 1–5 The site of the immunological response in renal transplantation is the allograft. Consequently, the arachidonate products are also likely to be of renal origin and may be reflected in the urine. Thus the monitoring of urine for thromboxane, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins may reflect the immunological reaction. Moreover, since the early events in cell activation involve arachidonate release and metabolism, these products should provide an early indicator of increased activation. Recently we have observed increased urinary thromboxane B2 concentrations during human kidney allograft rejection.6

Keywords

Deep Venous Thrombosis Allograft Rejection Rejection Episode Acute Tubular Necrosis Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. L. Foegh
    • 1
  • J. F. Winchester
    • 1
  • M. Zmudka
    • 1
  • G. B. Helfrich
    • 1
  • P. W. Ramwell
    • 2
  • G. E. Schreiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Division of NephrologyGeorgetown University Medical CenterUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsGeorgetown University Medical CenterUSA

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